More Hip and Knee Arthroplasties done not a case of difference in preoperative scores

There has been an increase in the incidence of total hip and total knee replacements over a 10-year period and that is increasing relative to the local population

Although total hip and total knee arthroplasty cases have increased during the last ten years, researchers from the United Kingdom said this increase is not due to a change in functional scores measured preoperatively

“There has been an increase in the incidence of total hip and total knee replacements over a 10-year period and that is increasing relative to the local population,” Lucy Bailey, of the North Hampshire Hospital, United Kingdom, said in her presentation. “There is no change in the average age of the patient, and no change in the preoperative functional scores.”

Bailey presented the results at the British Orthopaedic Association Congress 2012. 

The researchers gathered population data from national statistics and compared them to the number of joint replacement operations done in District General Hospitals from 2000 and 2009. While the number of joint replacement procedures increased beyond the increase in the local population, there was no significant difference in age and preoperative Oxford and WOMAC scores, Bailey said.

Bailey suggested an increase in obesity rates during the past decade could be partly responsible, this among other factors such as changes in lifestyle and patient expectations.

“There are definitely many patients who live an active lifestyle and that may be leading them to seek attention for their osteoarthritis,” Bailey said.

 

Reference:

Price M, Bailey L, Bryan-Evans T, et al. Increasing rates of lower limb arthroplasty are not due to a change in preoperative functioning status.

A 10-year DGH based prospective cohort study. Paper #O212. Presented at the British Orthopaedic Association Congress 2012. Sept. 11-14. Manchester.